Hall Clean-up: Saturday 16th June (2.00-4.00pm)

Hanshan and Shide (active late 8th–early 9th century) were Chan Buddhist monks who held low-level positions at Guoqingsi, a temple on China’s sacred Mount Tiantai. © Metropolitan Museum of Art.Hall Clean-up: Saturday 16th June (2.00-4.00pm)

If you would like to lend a hand (with even just a little job) it would be very much appreciated.

Just pop in whenever convenient to you during the clean-up time and you will receive a warm welcome.

Hanging scroll

Hanshan and Shide (active late 8th–early 9th century) were Chan Buddhist monks who held low-level positions at Guoqingsi, a temple on China’s sacred Mount Tiantai. Turned away from the viewer here, Hanshan (“Cold Mountain”) was a reclusive monk-poet. Shide, his constant companion, carries a broom indicating his role as the temple’s janitor. The pair of figures came to represent an iconoclastic aspect of Chan (Japanese: Zen) monastic practice and was a popular theme in Japanese painting.

In the Buddhist tradition, Hanshan and Shide were also honoured as emanations of the bodhisattvas Monju and Fugen (Sanskrit: Manjusri and Samantabhadra), representing the virtues of wisdom and compassion.

The inscription refers to this association:

One is the Bodhisattva of the Great Path,
The other the Patriarch of the Great Buddha.
What evidence is there?
A broken broom, a tattered scripture,
and unrhymed verse.

[Inscribed by] Higashiyama Usō Mumei
–Translated by Aaron Rio

Hanshan and Shide (Japanese: Kanzan and Jittoku)

Artist: Itō Jakuchū (Japanese, 1716–1800) Calligraphy attributed to Ike Taiga (Japanese, 1723–1776)

© Metropolitan Museum of Art


Golden Buddha Centre
Totnes Buddhism.



Categories: Golden Buddha Centre

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